top of page

Learning is a complex and multifaceted process


Learning is a complex and multifaceted process, and how individuals learn best can vary widely. As a result, educators and psychologists have developed several models of learning preferences to help identify and cater to students' learning styles. In this article, we'll examine several of these models to understand better how individuals prefer to learn.

  1. VARK model:

The VARK model was developed by Neil Fleming in the late 1980s and is based on four learning styles: visual, auditory, reading/writing, and kinesthetic. Visual learners prefer to learn through visual aids such as diagrams, graphs, and videos. Auditory learners prefer to learn through verbal explanations and discussions. Reading/writing learners prefer to learn through text-based materials such as textbooks and lecture notes. Kinesthetic learners prefer to learn through hands-on activities and experiences.

  1. Honey and Mumford model:

The Honey and Mumford model was developed in the 1980s and is based on four learning styles: activist, reflector, theorist, and pragmatist. Activists prefer to learn through practical experiences and try things out for themselves—reflectors like to learn through observation and taking time to think things over. Theorists prefer to learn through analysis and logical thinking. Pragmatists prefer to learn by trying things out in practice and applying what they have learned.

  1. Kolb model:

The Kolb model was developed in the 1970s and is based on four learning styles: diverging, assimilating, converging, and accommodating. Diverging learners prefer to learn through concrete experiences and reflection. Assimilating learners prefer to learn through abstract concepts and theories. Converging learners prefer to learn through practical application and problem-solving. Accommodating learners prefer learning by actively engaging with their environment and trying new things.

  1. Felder-Silverman model:

The Felder-Silverman model was developed in the 1980s and is based on four learning styles: sensing/intuitive, visual/verbal, active/reflective, and sequential/global. Sensing learners prefer to learn through concrete and practical experiences, while intuitive learners prefer to learn through abstract concepts and theories. Visual learners prefer to learn through visual aids such as diagrams and graphs, while verbal learners prefer to learn through written and spoken words. Active learners prefer to learn through hands-on experiences, while reflective learners prefer to learn through observation and reflection. Sequential learners prefer to learn in a linear and organized way, while global learners prefer to learn by seeing the big picture and making connections.

While there are many different models of learning preferences, they all share a common goal: to help individuals better understand their learning styles and tastes to maximize their learning potential. By examining these different models, educators and psychologists can better understand how individuals prefer to learn and tailor their teaching methods accordingly. This can lead to more effective and personalized learning experiences, ultimately benefiting both the individual and the broader society.

0 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page