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JLBC OF MILITARY AND STRATEGIC STUDIES


JLBC OF MILITARY AND STRATEGIC STUDIES

There has been a quest to develop effective leaders of individuals that are not necessarily born with leadership potential. For the most part, leadership is common-sense; it fails to find such traits; influential leaders are not necessarily born with. Leadership skills led to theories that differentiate between behaviors, the main distinction between task-oriented and people-oriented behavior. This distinction is still valued in militaries: that there is little room on the battlefield to focus on everyone’s feelings is identified to legitimize task-oriented behavior in that specific context. Leaders sometimes apply an individual-centric approach to ‘compensate’ for this in peaceful circumstances. The rough rule of thumb; this theory offers little preparation for what military leaders should do in a given circumstance. Leaders determine ‘which combination of relations-oriented and task-oriented behavior will work best.’ Such contingency theories assume that leaders can choose between different styles of leadership. Although there is little validation for these theories, militaries use them today because situations change quickly in current adaptation, and operations are often necessary.

JLBC Cadets, in contrast to contingency models, some theories describe a ‘one best way’ of leadership. Familiar examples are inspirational, charismatic, and transformational leadership. However, some of these approaches – especially that of charismatic leadership – might seem to amount to a return to the trait approach, but this is not the case. In these modern theories, Charisma is something that followers attribute to leaders (and is thus not a trait), and leaders can learn to behave in a way that makes this attribution.

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