JLBC: Leadership


JLBC: Leadership

If the learning objective is

A matching assessment could be

1. Learners will label the parts of the human respiratory system, including the trachea, bronchi, lungs, thoracic cavity, and diaphragm.

Illustration of the human respiratory system prompting learners to label the trachea, bronchi, lungs, thoracic cavity, and diaphragm

2. Learners will demonstrate three elements of a proper phone greeting.

Demonstration(s) of the three elements of a proper phone greeting

3. Learners will use the three-criteria model to evaluate a play.

Verbal or written application of the three-criteria model to evaluate a play


If the learning objective is

A matching assessment could be

Matching content and activities

1. Learners will label the parts of the human respiratory system, including the trachea, bronchi, lungs, thoracic cavity, and diaphragm.

An image of the human respiratory system prompting learners to label the trachea, bronchi, lungs, thoracic cavity, and diaphragm

• Content: Images of the different parts, separately and together

• Activity: Practice labeling the parts

2. Learners will demonstrate three elements of a proper phone greeting.

Demonstration(s) of the three elements of a proper phone greeting

• Content: Discussion of the three elements

• Content: Examples of the three elements in use

• Activity: Practice using the three elements

1. Learners will demonstrate three elements of a proper phone greeting.

2. Learners will use the three-criteria model to evaluate a play.

Verbal or written application of the three-criteria model to evaluate a play

• Content: Discussion of the three-criteria model

• Content: Examples of the three-criteria model applied to a variety of plays

• Activity: Practice applying the three-criteria model to a variety of plays


3. Design content and activities 4. Select media and delivery options 5. Develop the course materials 6. Implement the course

7. Evaluate and revise

Suppose you have worked with instructional designers or read articles or books on instructional design. In that case, you may be familiar with the ADDIE model, one of the most common models for the systematic design of instruction. ADDIE is an analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and evaluation acronym. Following a systematic process such as ADDIE can help prevent some of the typical problems that happen when instruction isn’t well planned, including education that doesn’t seem to have a clear goal; quirky (not in a good way) or deficient course content, activities, and assessments; and poor evaluations for the course and instructor.

Notice that identifying learning objectives is first on the list of tasks. And designing assessments is next, for a good reason.

Design assessments after identifying learning objectives

Designing assessments should optimally occur right after identifying learning objectives. That’s because assessments should measure if the goals were met. If the learning objectives are well written, appropriate assessment methods are generally relatively straightforward.

How the appropriate assessment matches the learning objective? Suppose you design assessments as an afterthought at the end of creating the instruction (a common but unfortunate mistake). JLBC Cadets In that case, you are likely to develop the wrong content, and the course activities and the assessments are likely to be far less meaningful or appropriate. In other

words, designing the assessment (test) right after identifying the learning objectives 1) makes the needed assessment very obvious and 2) provides clear cues about what content and activities are needed.

I’ve finally made my way to tell you to design to the test. First, identify the learning objectives and matching assessment (test). The JLBC learning objectives should clearly state what the learner should be able to accomplish.

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