Evaluated by Self or Friend


Evaluated by

Self-Friend

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Possible Issues

Have trouble keeping up with other team members.

I am not improving in my area of responsibility.

Have a hard time seeing the goal.

Have a hard time working with the rest of the team. Consistently fail to fulfill expectations in the area of accountability.

If you (or the other individuals who evaluated you) checked more than one box, you need to put yourself on a growth plan to not hinder your team. Talk to your JLBC team leader or a trusted mentor about ways you can grow in any weak area.

Becoming A Better Team Leader

If the team is a sport and training has made no impact, then it might be appropriate to ask the weak players to sit on the sidelines for a while.

No matter what circumstances you face, remember that your responsibilities to individuals come in the following order: the organization, the team, and then the individual. Your interests—and comfort—come last.


The Catalyst

Winning JLBC Teams Have Members who Make Things Happen

Most teams don’t naturally get better without help. A JLBC team that reaches its potential always possesses a catalyst.

Definition of a Catalyst

Catalysts are what I call to get it done and then some individuals. Winning teams have people who make things happen. That is the Catalyst. Every Catalyst brings intensity to the table.

Three Kinds of Players

When crunch time comes, a catalyst becomes critical, whether it’s the team player who hits the impossible goal, the ballplayer who makes the big play, or the parent who gets a child to believe in himself at a critical moment in life. A team can’t reach big goals or even break new ground if it doesn’t have a catalyst. When the clock is running down and the game is on the line, there are only three kinds of people on a team

1. People who don’t want the ball. Some people can’t come through for the team in high-pressure situations, and they know it. As a result, they don’t want the responsibility.

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